In mild climates, borage will bloom continuously nearly all year, so it’s a wonderful choice for attracting native pollinators – particularly bumblebees. The leaves and flowers are edible with a flavour reminiscent of cucumbers. Borage is an excellent all around companion plant. Borage deters tomato hornworm and cabbage worms, and is particularly good planted near tomatoes and strawberries. Very attractive to pollinators, and excellent for the soil and compost. Borage is deer-proof. Follow along with this handy How to Grow Borage Guide.

Latin
Borago officinalis
Family: Boraginaceae

Difficulty
Easy

Season & Zone
Season: Cool season
Exposure: Full sun to partial shade
Zone: 2-12

Timing
Direct sow in April and May. Borage develops a delicate taproot, so it’s best direct sown where it is to grow. Borage does not transplant well. Optimal soil temperature for germination: 21°C (70°F). Seeds should sprout in 5-15 days.

Starting
Sow seeds 1cm (½”) deep, and thin to 60cm (24″) apart. Borage will get large and fill in spaces between plants.

Growing
Borage is an un-fussy self sowing annual. To avoid self-sowing, the flower heads need to be picked regularly. Borage does best in full sun in well drained soil.

Harvest
Pick fresh flowers for freezing or drying for bouquets. Cut the fresh leaves during the summer to add to salads or spreads.

Seed Info
Usual seed life: 3 years.

Companion Planting
Borage is an excellent all around companion plant. Borage deters hornworm and cabbage worms, and is particularly useful planted near tomatoes and strawberries. Very attractive to pollinators and excellent for the soil and compost. Borage is deer-proof.

More on Companion Planting.

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