Calypso

Calypso

SKU: HR1191
This compact, low-growing variety comes from a British breeding program, and it's the slowest to bolt in side by side trials — resisting the urge to bolt by as many as three weeks. Its flavour is clean and herbal, bringing distinctive sharpness to broths, tacos, and countless other meals. Read More

Exposure Sun or partial shade

Matures in 50 days

Season Cool season

Shipping & Returns

West Coast Seeds ships anywhere in North America. However, we are not able to ship garlic, potatoes, asparagus crowns, bulbs, onion sets, Mason bee cocoons, or nematodes outside of Canada. We regret, we cannot accept returns or damages for orders outside of Canada. The minimum shipping charge to the US is $6.99.

More details about Calypso

Coriandrum sativum. While other types of cilantro have sent up their tall flower stalks and set seed, Calypso cilantro remains bushy and productive. This compact, low-growing variety comes from a British breeding program, and it's the slowest to bolt in side by side trials — resisting the urge to bolt by as many as three weeks. Its flavour is clean and herbal, bringing distinctive sharpness to broths, tacos, and countless other meals. Direct sow short rows from mid-spring to the end of summer. Its low growing point allows it to regrow after multiple cuts for an extended harvest.

Matures in 50 days. (Open-pollinated seeds)

All About Calypso

Latin

Latin
Coriandrum sativum
Family: Apiaceae

Difficulty

Difficulty
Easy

Season & Zone

Season & Zone
Season: Cool season
Exposure: Sun or part-shade
Zone: Will overwinter with protection in Zones 7+

Timing

Timing
Direct sow from just after the last frost date to late spring. Direct sow in the fall under cover for a winter crop. Optimal soil temperature for germination: 15°C (60°F). Seeds should sprout in 5-10 days.

Starting

Starting
Sow 2cm (1″) deep in short rows. Thin seedlings to stand 5-10cm (2-4″) apart if harvesting leaves. If growing for seed, allow 23cm (9″) between plants.

Growing

Growing
Cilantro is tricky because several factors can cause it to bolt. Avoid transplanting for this reason, and avoid hot conditions as well as too much moisture. It does best in light, well-drained soil in partial shade, in relatively dry conditions. This is easy to achieve beneath a cloche in winter, where cilantro will thrive. Once it blooms, the seeds ripen suddenly, in only a couple of days, so care should be taken to prevent self sowing or simply losing those useful seeds.

Harvest

Harvest
Pick young leaves once they have reached about 10cm (4″) in height. The flavour, though intense when fresh, diminishes quickly when dried or cooked, so always add cilantro just before serving. Try freezing it in ice cube trays with water. The stems and roots are also full of flavour. Harvest the seeds by sticking 6 or 8 seed heads in a paper bag and hanging it up somewhere airy, away from direct sunlight. The bag will catch the seeds as they ripen and fall out.

Seed Info

Seed Info
Usual seed life: 3 years.

Companion Planting

Companion Planting
Cilantro repels aphids, potato beetles, and spider mites. It attracts hoverflies and other beneficial predatory insects.

More on Companion Planting.

How to Grow Cilantro

Step 1: Timing

Direct sow from just after the last frost date to late spring. Direct sow in the fall under cover for a winter crop. Optimal soil temperature for germination: 15°C (60°F). Seeds should sprout in 5-10 days.

Step 2: Starting

Sow 2cm (1″) deep in short rows. Thin seedlings to stand 5-10cm (2-4″) apart if harvesting leaves. If growing for seed, allow 23cm (9″) between plants.

Step 3: Growing

Cilantro is tricky because several factors can cause it to bolt. Avoid transplanting for this reason, and avoid hot conditions as well as too much moisture. It does best in light, well-drained soil in partial shade, in relatively dry conditions. This is easy to achieve beneath a cloche in winter, where cilantro will thrive. Once it blooms, the seeds ripen suddenly, in only a couple of days, so care should be taken to prevent self sowing or simply losing those useful seeds.

Step 4: Germination

Usual seed life: 3 years.

Step 5: Harvest

Pick young leaves once they have reached about 10cm (4″) in height. The flavour, though intense when fresh, diminishes quickly when dried or cooked, so always add cilantro just before serving. Try freezing it in ice cube trays with water. The stems and roots are also full of flavour. Harvest the seeds by sticking 6 or 8 seed heads in a paper bag and hanging it up somewhere airy, away from direct sunlight. The bag will catch the seeds as they ripen and fall out.

Tips!

Companion Planting: Cilantro repels aphids, potato beetles, and spider mites. It attracts hoverflies and other beneficial predatory insects.

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