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Santo Long Standing

  • Easy to grow
  • Mature seeds are coriander
  • With a bit of cover, it will overwinter
  • Grows to 50cm (20″)
  • Grows in partial shade
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Coriandrum sativum. Cilantro “Santo” is bred to be slow bolting. Direct sow short rows of these frost-tolerant plants every other week from spring to late summer for continuous harvest. The mature seeds, better known as coriander, are easy to harvest, and used in many dishes – notably curry powder blends. Keep an eye you your cilantro crop because the flowering process (bolting) is famously quick in this plant. As soon as a central stem appears and the uppermost leaves become frilly, it’s time to harvest the whole plant, roots and all. The roots are useful – check out our Coriander Root Paste recipe. Because of this taproot, cilantro does not transplant well.

If growing for seeds, simply allow the plants to flower. Cilantro flowers are highly attractive to beneficial insects like Syrphid flies, lacewings, and lady beetles. Be warned that if the seeds are not harvested when they are mature, you will have volunteer cilantro plants for years to come.

Cilantro will grow somewhat leggy, but productively in partial shade, and it is quite tolerant of cool temperatures. With the protection of a cloche greenhouse, cilantro will continue growing all winter.

How to Grow Cilantro

Cilantro is challenging to grow in some gardens. The big leaves that we see in stores are harvested from tiny plants. The secret is to give cilantro deep soil for the roots, try placing the plant in shade, pick frequently and resow. Follow along with this handy How to Grow Cilantro Guide and grow fresh flavour in your garden this spring.

Latin
Coriandrum sativum
Family: Apiaceae

Difficulty
Easy

Season & Zone
Season: Cool season
Exposure: Sun or part-shade
Zone: 2-12. Will overwinter with protection in Zone 7

Timing
Direct sow from April 1st to the end of August. Direct sow in September under cover for a winter crop. Optimal soil temperature for germination: 15°C (60°F). Seeds should sprout in 5-10 days.

Starting
Sow 2cm (1″) deep in short rows. Thin seedlings to stand 5-10cm (2-4″) apart if harvesting leaves. If growing for seed, allow 23cm (9″) between plants.

Growing
Cilantro is tricky because several factors can cause it to bolt. Avoid transplanting for this reason, and avoid hot conditions as well as too much moisture. It does best in light, well-drained soil in partial shade, in relatively dry conditions. This is easy to achieve beneath a cloche in winter, where cilantro will thrive. Once it blooms, the seeds ripen suddenly, in only a couple of days, so care should be taken to prevent self sowing or simply losing those useful seeds.

Harvest
Pick young leaves once they have reached about 10cm (4″) in height. The flavour, though intense when fresh, diminishes quickly when dried or cooked, so always add cilantro just before serving. If you need to preserve it, try freezing it in ice cube trays with water. The stems and roots are also full of flavour. Harvest the seeds by sticking 6 or 8 seed heads in a paper bag and hanging it up somwhere airy, away from direct sunlight. The bag will catch the seeds as they ripen and fall out.

Seed Info
Usual seed life: 3 years.

Companion Planting
Cilantro repels aphids, potato beetles, and spider mites.

More on Companion Planting.

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Size PriceWishlist
HR1073A $2.99
1g (approx. 68 seeds)
HR1073B $3.99
5g (approx. 510 seeds)
HR1073C $5.99
25g (approx. 2550 seeds)
HR1073D $8.99
100g (approx. 10200 seeds)
HR1073E $24.99
500g (approx. 51000 seeds)
HR1073F $32.99
1000g (approx. 102000 seeds)