Natalino

Natalino

SKU: BR190
Natalino, a Romanesco broccoli, is very similar to Minaret but is a larger plant that matures later. The chartreuse coloured, pointed buds spiral around 10-13cm (4-5") heads. Read More

Exposure Full-sun

Matures in 90 days

Season Cool season

Shipping & Returns

West Coast Seeds ships anywhere in North America. However, we are not able to ship garlic, potatoes, asparagus crowns, bulbs, onion sets, Mason bee cocoons, or nematodes outside of Canada. We regret, we cannot accept returns or damages for orders outside of Canada. The minimum shipping charge to the US is $6.99.

More details about Natalino

Natalino, a Romanesco broccoli, is very similar to Minaret but is a larger plant that matures later. The chartreuse coloured, pointed buds spiral around 10-13cm (4-5") heads. Natalino broccoli seeds broccoli is best planted to mature in September to October. Cut promptly while it is still pale-green. Natalino makes a wonderful addition to a vegetable dip tray with its curious look and fantastic flavour. Start indoors and transplant out under lightweight row cover to avoid the caterpillars of the Cabbage White butterfly. Broccoli is a fantastic source of vitamins A and D, dietary fibre, and potassium.

Matures in 90 days. (Open-pollinated seeds)

Quick Facts:

    • Open-pollinated seeds
    • Matures in 90 days
    • Incredible appearance
    • Light green broccoli
    • Heirloom

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All About Natalino

Latin

Latin
Brassica oleraceae var. italica
Family: Brassicaceae

Difficulty

Difficulty
Moderately challenging

Season & Zone

Season & Zone
Season: Cool season
Exposure: Full-sun

Timing

Timing
Start indoors right around the last frost date or later in spring for summer harvest in 2 to 3 months. For fall harvest, start indoors late spring and transplant in July, harvesting just before the first frost date. For overwintering sprouting broccoli in mild winter areas, start indoors late March to mid-April, and harvest the following February to May. Seeds will germinate in 7-10 days. Optimal temperature for germination: 10-30°C (50-85°F).

Starting

Starting
Sow indoors, 3 or 4 seeds per pot, 5mm (¼”) deep, under very bright light. Thin to the strongest plant. Space transplants 45-60cm (18-24″) apart in rows 75-90cm (30-36″) apart.

Days to Maturity

Days to Maturity
From transplant date.

Growing

Growing
Ideal pH: 6.0-6.8. Broccoli is a moderate to heavy feeder that does best in humus-rich soil amended with composted manure. Mix ¼-½ cup complete organic fertilizer into the soil under each transplant. Transplants should be set out by the time they have 6-8 true leaves. When plants are 20-25cm (8-10″) tall, push soil around the stems up to the first big leaf to encourage side shoots. Broccoli does best in cool weather.

Harvest

Harvest
Cut the crown portion of the broccoli with 5 to 6 inches of stem, after it’s fully developed, but before it begins to loosen and separate and the individual flowers start to develop into bright yellow blooms. Removing the central head stimulates regrowth to develop for later pickings. Cutting the head lower on the stem will encourage fewer, but larger side-shoots. The regrowth portion grows from the base of the lower leaves. You can usually continue to harvest broccoli for several weeks.

Seed Info

Seed Info
In optimum conditions at least 80% of seeds will germinate. Usual seed life: 3 years. Per 100′ row: 170 seeds, per acre: 30M seeds.

Diseases & Pests

Diseases & Pests
Slugs and snails – Slugs are attracted to beer, so place a little beer in a cup dug into the ground. Sprinkle broken eggshells around plants to deter slugs and snails.
Flea beetles – Use row covers to help protect plants from early damage. Put in place at planting and remove before temperatures get too hot in midsummer. Control weeds.
Cabbage root maggot – White maggots (larvae) attack all plants of the cabbage family. Larvae tunnel in and feed on roots of plants. Damage causes wilting early on, death of plants a little later on.
Cabbage aphids – A hard stream of water can be used to remove aphids from plants. Wash off with water occasionally as needed early in the day. Check for evidence of natural enemies such as grey-brown or bloated parasitized aphids and the presence of alligator-like larvae of lady beetles and lacewings.
Cabbageworms – Handpick and destroy. Row covers may be useful on small plantings to help protect plants from early damage. Put in place at planting and remove before temperatures get too hot in midsummer.
To help reduce disease, do not plant broccoli or other Brassicas in the same location more than once every three or four years.

Companion Planting

Companion Planting
All Brassicas benefit from chamomile, dill, mint, rosemary, and sage. Avoid planting near eggplants, peppers, potatoes, or tomatoes.

More on Companion Planting.

How to Grow Broccoli

Step 1: Timing

Start indoors right around the last frost date or later in spring for summer harvest in 2 to 3 months. For fall harvest, start indoors late spring and transplant in July, harvesting just before the first frost date. For overwintering sprouting broccoli in mild winter areas, start indoors late March to mid-April, and harvest the following February to May. Seeds will germinate in 7-10 days. Optimal temperature for germination: 10-30°C (50-85°F).

Step 2: Starting

Sow indoors, 3 or 4 seeds per pot, 5mm (¼”) deep, under very bright light. Thin to the strongest plant. Space transplants 45-60cm (18-24″) apart in rows 75-90cm (30-36″) apart.

Step 3: Growing

Ideal pH: 6.0-6.8.

Broccoli is a moderate to heavy feeder that does best in humus-rich soil amended with composted manure. Mix ¼-½ cup complete organic fertilizer into the soil under each transplant. Transplants should be set out by the time they have 6-8 true leaves. When plants are 20-25cm (8-10″) tall, push soil around the stems up to the first big leaf to encourage side shoots. Broccoli does best in cool weather.

Step 4: Germination

Days to maturity: From transplant date.

In optimum conditions at least 80% of seeds will germinate. Usual seed life: 3 years. Per 100′ row: 170 seeds, per acre: 30M seeds.

Step 5: Harvest

Cut the crown portion of the broccoli with 5 to 6 inches of stem, after it’s fully developed, but before it begins to loosen and separate and the individual flowers start to develop into bright yellow blooms. Removing the central head stimulates regrowth to develop for later pickings. Cutting the head lower on the stem will encourage fewer, but larger side-shoots. The regrowth portion grows from the base of the lower leaves. You can usually continue to harvest broccoli for several weeks.

Tips!

Diseases & Pests: Flea beetles – Use row covers to help protect plants from early damage. Put in place at planting and remove before temperatures get too hot in midsummer.

Cabbage root maggot – White maggots (larvae) attack all plants of the cabbage family. Larvae tunnel in and feed on roots of plants. Damage causes wilting early on, death of plants a little later on.

Cabbage aphids – A hard stream of water can be used to remove aphids from plants. Wash off with water occasionally as needed early in the day.

Cabbageworms – Handpick and destroy.

To help reduce disease, do not plant broccoli or other Brassicas in the same location more than once every three or four years.

Companion Planting: All Brassicas benefit from chamomile, dill, mint, rosemary, and sage. Avoid planting near eggplants, peppers, potatoes, or tomatoes.

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