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Sugar Ann

Sugar Ann

Extra early, incredibly sweet snap peas on short, 60cm (2') vines that don't require trellising. Excellent choice for smaller garden spaces. The bushy plants produce crisp, tasty, 6cm (2½") pods, and have excellent resistance to pea enation virus and powdery mildew. 1984 AAS Winner and RHS Award Winner for Garden Merit.
Matures in 56 days. (open pollinated seeds)

PE617 A (25g) approximately 112 seeds
PE617 B (75g) approximately 337 seeds
PE617 C (225g) approximately 1012 seeds
PE617 D (1kg) approximately 4500 seeds
PE617 E (5kg) approximately 22500 seeds
PE617 S (22.7kg) approximately 102150 seeds

Full Sun
Item No Product Weight Est.Seed Ct Price Qty.
PE617A Sugar Ann (Available) 25 g 100 2.99  
PE617B Sugar Ann (Available) 75 g 337 3.99  
PE617C Sugar Ann (Available) 225 g 1012 9.99  
PE617D Sugar Ann (Available) 1000 g 4500 24.99  
PE617E Sugar Ann (Available) 5000 g 20000 69.99  
PE617S Sugar Ann (Available) 22700 g 102150 159.99  
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Growing Details


Reviews



Snap Peas
Submitted by Mountain Jack on June 28, 2013
Overall Rating :
5 out of 5 (Overall Rating)

This is my second year at this and my first doing snap peas. I planted them in containers (3' high x 2' across) on April 7...it's now June 28 (13th week) and they are producing big fat delicious peas....my 8 yr old can't pass them without picking a few and popping them in her mouth...
Reviewer Information
Location: North Vancouver
Would recommend: Yes
Type of gardening: Containers
Gardening skill: Beginner
Types of plants: Vegetables
Gardening experience: 1-5 years

Delicious pods of sweetness
Submitted by judysunshine on August 22, 2010
Overall Rating :
5 out of 5 (Overall Rating)

These snap peas were so easy and have been producing all year. I planted them pretty early (March/April) and by June we were enjoying the pods. The longer you leave them, the fatter/rounder the pods get, the sweeter they taste. It's late-August now and the same plants are still producing, though they have died off some. I also planted another batch in mid-July and they are taking off too. One thing to note: I planted two sets of peas. One in my garden, with really good soil/compost, and then I also planted some in pots, with regular potting soil and a bit of compost. The potted plants produced just a little bit, and only grew about 1/3 of the size of the garden-planted peas. I'm not sure if it's the pot, or the soil that made the difference, but I'm guessing it's the soil because all of my veggies in the garden did really well. (A neighbour said my broccoli (Nutra Bud) looked professional quality!)
Reviewer Information
Location: Sunshine Coast
Would recommend: Yes
Type of gardening: Small Garden
Gardening skill: Moderately skilled
Types of plants: Herbs,Flowers,Vegetables,Perennials
Gardening experience: 1-5 years

Jury is still out
Submitted by Michael on July 16, 2010
Overall Rating :
3 out of 5 (Overall Rating)

Let me first say that this season has been terrible for peas. Bush peas refused to germinate, and the Sugar Ann\'s did not fair much better. My germination was approximately 45-60%. That being said, the peas that did come up proved to be nice, compact vines closer to bush peas than vines. On average we harvested between 8 and 12 pods per plant. Taste was good without being exceptional. Perhaps I was expecting something a little sweeter. The pods held up well under challenging conditions and perhaps the weather was the cause of slightly tough pods. Still, far, far superior than what you can get on a commercial level.
Reviewer Information
Location: Central Ontario
Would recommend: Yes
Type of gardening: Large Garden
Gardening skill: Moderately skilled
Types of plants: Vegetables
Gardening experience: 1-5 years